Cover Your Ass-ets: Choose the Right Insurance Coverage

Financial Freedom in 2021! Take Action: Day 22

Let’s talk insurance. No one wants to pay for it, but no one wants to live without it either. All the hard work we’ve put into planning ahead for the betterment of our family could be completely wiped out with one disaster, diagnosis, disability, or death. This is why having an emergency fund as well as the right amount and right types of insurance are so important.

Life Insurance

Choosing the right type and amount of life insurance can be very tricky. Those who sell it have gotten creative in marketing the different types, not only as insurance but also as an investment. I prefer to look at insurance for what it actually is: protection of my assets. It is separate from my investments.

When doing an assessment of life insurance, a good question to ask is, “If I die, will a loved one need my income replaced to be able to survive or will a loved one need to pay another to take on my familial duties?” If you are a working parent or spouse, and your family depends on your income, life insurance is a must. If you are a stay at home parent, and your family depends on the work that you do at home, then life insurance is also a must. (The working parent would need to pay a caregiver to take on your responsibilities.)

I’ve heard that a good rule of thumb for deciding on the amount of life insurance to buy is to double your annual expenses, and then add a -0-. So, if you’re able to live on $50,000/year, double that and add a -0-. That would equate to a $1,000,000 policy.

Life insurance plans offered by employers may not provide enough coverage for your family. It is likely that a supplemental plan will be required to reach the benefit amounts mentioned above.

There are also many other considerations regarding which type of life insurance is the best choice. When in doubt, many personal finance experts recommend sticking with term insurance. Keep in mind that you only need to carry life insurance until you no longer have people dependent on your income and/or until you’ve reached a level of wealth allowing you to self-insure.

With all this being said, we know that any dollar amount will not take away the extreme emotional loss of a family member. Life insurance can also allow for some peace of mind and money for grief support during such a devastating time for a family.

Health Insurance

It’s outrageous, I know! We spend $15,800 per year on premiums to cover our family… and that’s on a high deductible group healthcare plan. If we had chosen the lower deductible plan, we’d be out an additional $2,000. We’re covered through my husband’s employer, but what we pay on premiums each month is nearly what I net from my part time job. But because our family’s health is an incredible asset, we pay to protect it.

I’d prefer to pay a lot less to protect this asset, but we haven’t found a way to qualify for less costly options. If anyone has any advice in this area, I’m all ears!

However, if you meet certain income qualifications, there are great options on the health insurance marketplace (healthcare.gov). Unfortunately, open enrollment has closed for the year, but if you have experienced a life-changing event, such as marriage, having a baby, or losing your job, you can still purchase a plan, hopefully with significant discounts.I am probably not the best person to be offering advice in this area because we spend an arm and a leg on this type of insurance, but I do believe that keeping an up-to-date health profile on your family can help you determine which plan is the best choice for you. If you rarely go to the doctor and each family member has good health overall, you can opt for the higher deductible plan and save a few thousand dollars per year. My husband and I have to reassess each year which plan might be best due to the health issues our family is currently facing. A couple years ago, we calculated that we spent well over $23,000 on premiums and medical care due to a baby with asthma and a new Crohn’s diagnosis for our eldest child. Thankfully, we have been able to get both conditions under control, so we are able to go back to the less expensive, higher deductible plan. So, be sure to review the options offered by your employer each year rather than just renewing what you’ve always had.

One more tip – be sure to look into whether you’re eligible for an HSA. This is one of the best ways that you can get a little bit further ahead in investing for retirement.

Disability Insurance

As mentioned in the post, Take Action: Day 1, your ability to earn an income is one of your greatest assets, and you buy insurance protects assets. Therefore, it would make sense to cover yourself in case of disability.

According to statistics, you have a 1 in 4 chance of becoming disabled during your working career. Employer benefits usually only pay 40-60% of salary, on which you still have to pay taxes and high insurance premiums. These policies are often short-term, meaning that you’d have to apply for government assistance after that term ends, and Social Security disability claims often take years to process and to be awarded. (Minimum time is 3 months for processing claim and then many end up in court.)

Many people choose to supplement their company disability coverage with another plan to cover at least half of their annual income (or the amount NOT covered by the company plan benefit).

Homeowner’s/Renter’s Insurance

Here we are with another asset that needs protection: your home and/or rental property. Thankfully, you can really shop around to find discounts and opt for higher deductible plans to lower your premiums. I’d recommend using a broker who can shop around for you.

Car Insurance

Again, you can find a broker to shop around for you and get you the maximum discounts. Consider a higher deductible, less comprehensive coverage for older vehicles, and reduced rates for safe driver record, career/company affiliations, and bundled insurance packages.

Umbrella Insurance

This is pretty much insurance for your insurance. Yep, that’s a thing. Also called Liability Insurance, it’s a relatively affordable way to protect you from the “extras” that your insurance policy may not cover, including lawsuits for additional damages.

This list of types of insurance includes all of the ones highly recommended. There are many other types not mentioned here that may protect some of your personal or professional assets.

However, some insurance options I tend to steer clear of are:

  • Rental Car Coverage: My own car insurance and travel credit cards have sufficient coverage.
  • Mortgage Life Insurance: This is life insurance for the purposes of paying off your mortgage if you die. Instead of paying for a rider or additional policy, just make sure you have adequate life insurance coverage as mentioned above.
  • Identity Theft Insurance: Keep tabs on your accounts and set security alerts for each of your cards and accounts to protect yourself without buying an insurance policy.
  • Credit Card Payment Protection: Your disability or life insurance policies should help to cover credit card payments in case of an emergency. Also, don’t forget that emergency fund you’ve had saved up.
  • Long-Term Care: This one is a toughie! I’m currently of the mindset that my husband and I will be able to self-insure for future long-term care (think assisted living or nursing home), but I have been debating buying a policy for my father. Long-term care insurance is often recommended for people who have too much money to qualify for Medicaid (which is only used toward nursing home care) yet not enough money to pay all expenses out of pocket. And the expenses are HIGH! I’m honestly still on the fence about what to do, but for now, we’re considering other investment options to accumulate cash toward long-term care if/when it becomes necessary.
  • Travel Insurance: With the current liberal cancellation policies for airfare and hotel stays, it’s not necessary. When cancellation policies are a bit stricter, I take each trip case by case. More expensive travel or further-away destinations sometimes warrant a travel insurance policy, especially when kids are involved. The risk of illness goes up when traveling with a large family.

Today’s action step is to review your insurance plans and policies. Consider whether you really need each policy you have or if you need to add more. Determine whether you have adequate coverage based on your family’s financial situation. Then, shop around for the best rates

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s